For the most part, conservative groups on campuses simply wish to study the Bible together, pray and worship in ways that deepen their own sense of Godliness. These groups welcome nonbelievers.

They might even let someone like myself – a Christian of a different stripe – sit down and discuss their views. A campus is, or ought to be, a space where contradictory ideas are allowed to flourish, where genuine and deeply respectful debate can occur.

I would urge colleges and universities to give these kids their keys back. Let them elect officers in their organization who actually adhere to the ideas promoted by the group. That’s the essence of democracy.

As long as these groups don’t practice hatred or discrimination, or try to impose their views on others, let them be.

Our intellectual communities flourish when there are all kinds of ideas circulating, even ones we find curious or objectionable.

Opinion: Bowdoin College case reflects new campus ‘thought police’ – Jay Parini. But in the view of Bowdoin’s administrators, and those of many other colleges and universities, such groups “practice … discrimination” simply by holding the beliefs that they hold.